Congratulations to Der-Hsien Lien on being specially reported at IEEE Spectrum and EE times Europe.

Congratulations to Der-Hsien Lien on being specially reported at IEEE Spectrum and EE times Europe.

7/16/2014

As Andrew Steckl outlined in his feature for IEEE Spectrum last year, paper has a lot of potential as a flexible material for printed electronics. The material is less expensive than other flexible materials, such as plastic. It boasts natural wicking properties that can be used to draw fluids into sensors. And it can be easily disposed of by shredding or burning.

Basic circuit components, such as wires, resistors, capacitors, transistors and diodes, have been printed on paper. But memory is one of the last frontiers, says graduate student Der-Hsien Lien, and it will be needed if we expect paper electronics to perform computation and store data.

Lien and his colleagues tackled the problem by setting out to build resistive RAM, or RRAM, memory cells. In this memory, the cell is sandwiched between two electrodes. An applied voltage pulls ions from one of the electrodes in the cell, which lowers the cell's resistance.

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